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Exhibitions in the Arts Area Libraries  

Last Updated: Apr 2, 2014 URL: http://guides.library.yale.edu/artsAreaExhibitions Print Guide Email Alerts

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AT HAAS

 

Jazz and the Book Arts

February 24 – June 16, 2014

Improvisation is the word that first comes to mind for many when they think of jazz. Imagine musicians playing together, being inspired by each other’s performance, and collaborating to make something new. Many visual artists take a similar approach, especially those working in the highly collaborative field of the book arts. This exhibition showcases artists who have been inspired by jazz music and musicians to create bookworks. Additionally, it presents examples of bookworks that have been inspired by other types of music and sound.

This exhibition is a companion to the student-curated exhibition at the Yale University Art Gallery: Jazz Lives: The Photographs of Lee Friedlander and Milt Hinton, on view at 1111 Chapel Street from April 4- September 7. The Haas Family Arts Library actively supports the research of the Yale University Art Gallery in addition to research by members of the Yale, national, and international arts communities.

 

AT MUSIC

 

Hot Spots: Highlights from the Jazz Collections in the Gilmore Music Library

SPRING 2014

Curator: Richard Boursy, Archivist, Irving S. Gilmore Music Library

Most of the Gilmore Music Library's holdings come from the classical tradition, but we are also a world-renowned center of jazz research. The Library is the home of the papers of the "King of Swing," Benny Goodman, as well as numerous other jazz figures, such as Mel Powell, Eddie Sauter, Slam Stewart, Red Norvo, and John Hammond. It also holds individual manuscripts by Duke Ellington, Artie Shaw, Fats Waller, and Glenn Miller. Hot Spots features a selection of these treasures, along with photographs of jazz luminaries from the papers of Stanley Dance and Helen Oakley Dance and Fred Plaut.

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