"Old Yale" Articles
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"Old Yale" Articles from the Yale Alumni Magazine

This page contains a list of "Old Yale" articles from the Yale Alumni Magazine. Links to online copies of those articles are provided where available.

  • A Dickensian Delight
    Year: 1987
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of Hillhouse Avenue. Includes statement by Charles Dickens, in 1868, that it was the most beautiful street in America.
    Page: 31
  • The Bowl's Beginnings
    Year: 1987
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of the Yale Bowl.
    Page: 59
  • Easy Reading
    Year: 1987
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of the Linonia and Brothers Room in SML. Includes brief history of the two debating societies after which the room in named: Linonia and Brothers-in-Unity.
    Page: 27
  • Berkeley's Alpine Hideaway
    Year: 1987
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of the Swiss Room on the second floor of Berkeley College. Given by Robert W. de Forest.
    Page: 15
  • The Admissions Office
    Year: 1987
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of the home at 149 Elm St, which housed the Undergraduate Admissions office in 1987. It is the oldest home in New Haven; originally home of James Pierpont.
    Page: 79
  • Street Hall blazed a trail
    Year: 1988
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of Street Hall, financed by August Street, located at the corners of Chapel and High Streets. It housed the School of Fine Arts, the first School to admit women at Yale; first exhibition opened in 1867.
    Page: 33
  • For which the Fence fell
    Year: 1988
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of Osborne Hall, on the corners of College and Chapel; replaced original fence. Dedicated on 1890, razed in 1926, replaced by Bingham dormitory.
    Page: 88
  • An intemperate encounter
    Year: 1988
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Account of Cary Nation's visit to Yale in 1902, and the hijinks of the "Jolly Eight." Also history of the photograph of Nation with Yale students, doctored to show drinking and smoking.
    Page: 19
  • Walter Camp's Daily Dozen
    Year: 1988
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Short biographical sketch of Walter Camp and history of the Daily Dozen fitness system.
    Page: 100
  • Medical beginnings
    Year: 1989
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of Sheffield Hall at the corners of Grove and Prospect. Built by James Hillhouse, sold to the University in 1814, it housed the University's first Medical School.
    Page: 27
  • Forestry from the roots
    Year: 1989
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of the early years of the forestry school (founded by Gifford Pinchot), and of the summer forestry camp in Milford, Pennsylvania.
    Page: 19
  • The White Pipes of Spring
    Year: 1989
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The issuing of clay pipes to graduating seniors on Class Day is one of the few traditions to have endured from the earliest days of Yale College to the preset. Before the institution of Class Day, seniors would meet for the last time in July, on what was
    Page: 20
  • A gem of a gym
    Year: 1989
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Erected in 1959, Yale's first gymnasium was a simple, rectangular hall. But by the 1880s Yale men judged it to be the poorest college gymnasium in the East. As Yale's prowess in football, baseball, and crew grew a modern gymnasium became a necessity. F
    Page: 93
  • A Riotous Place to Live
    Year: 1989
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Between the time when the Old Campus was the only undergraduate campus and the era of the residential colleges, a second campus flourished at Yale. Known as the Berkeley Oval, the University broke ground for the construction of Berkeley Hall in 1893, the
    Page: 80
  • The Earliest Women
    Year: 1989
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Coeducation at the University started before 1969, the year that Yale College "went coed." Even before their official admission to the graduate and professional schools, women were permitted to enjoy some of the benefits of a Yale education by enrolling
    Page: 45
  • How Blue Began
    Year: 1990
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Would a Yale by any other color be the same? It comes as a surprise to many that for over a century after Yale's founding, the institution claimed no signature hue. Although diplomas issued by Yale in the eighteenth century were tied with blue ribbons,
    Page: 22
  • The Original Eli
    Year: 1990
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: In 1716, the trustees of the Collegiate School of Connecticut were deadlocked over relocation of the school from Saybrook to either New Haven or Hartford. In England, Elihu Yale's generous contributions to church and missionary societies brought him to t
    Page: 20
  • Cryptic Inscriptions
    Year: 1990
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: When it comes to mysterious buildings, Yale has a hefty share, but, unlikely as it may seem, the Hall of Graduate Studies also has a claim to the status of architectural enigma. The architectural plan, overseen by James Gamble Rogers, called for a commod
    Page: 37
  • A Palace for Rowing
    Year: 1991
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: For those few survivors who remember its opening, in 1911, the George Adee Memorial Boat House remains a symbol of the great days of Yale rowing. Crossing the I-95 bridge northbound over the Mill River at the mouth of the New Haven harbor, it is just pos
    Page: 37
  • Reclaiming the City from Cars
    Year: 1991
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: For nearly six decades, the charming walkway between Branford and Jonathan Edwards colleges has caused town and gown pedestrians to pause, contemplate its striking vistas, and explore its length, linking High and York streets. But before James Gamble Rog
    Page: 34
  • From Innovation, Tradition
    Year: 1991
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The pageantry of a Yale commencement instills a sense of history and continuity with the past in participant and guest alike. What appear to be ancient scholarly rites of procession, prayer, and address, performed in curiously cut and colored academic ca
  • The O'Neill Connection
    Year: 1991
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: George Pierce Baker, the founding father of the Yale School of Drama, arrived at Yale to establish the drama school after leaving Harvard, where his English 47 course in dramatic literature had evolved over three decades into the famous "47 Workshop." W
    Page: 21
  • Happy Hooliganism
    Year: 1992
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: In 1913, the traditional Washington's Birthday Fence Rush was voted out of existence by the sophomore and freshman classes, bringing to an abrupt end a College rite-of-passage that had flourished at Yale for a century or more. The roots of this ritual wa
  • Making a Medical School
    Year: 1992
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Medical education was launched at Yale in 1812, under the leadership of the eminent Dr. Nathan Smith, professor of the theory and practice of physic, surgery, and obstetrics. Under a strong faculty, including Benjamin Silliman, professor of chemistry and
  • An Eternal Campus Home
    Year: 1992
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Thousands of members of the Yale family have found their final resting place in one of America's first planned urban spaces, the Grove Street Cemetery. James Hillhouse of the Class of 1773, who planted New Haven's once-majestic elms, designed the cemetar
    Page: 18
  • Converts to the Wheel
    Year: 1992
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Yale cycling enthusiasts have played a leading part in the history of the intercollegiate sport. The saga goes back to 1866, when the French velocipede was introduced to America by Pierre Lallemont, who had immigrated to Connecticut from his native Franc
    Page: 31
  • Revealing Small Worlds
    Year: 1992
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The Yale Microscope of 1743 is the University's oldest surviving scientific instrument and may well be the first of its kind to have been brought to America. What moved the College into the serious study of science was a gift made in 1743 by Joseph Thomp
    Page: 19
  • A Palatial Pad
    Year: 1992
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: On May 22, 1892, William Henry Vanderbilt, then a junior at Yale, died tragically of typhoid fever. Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt II sought to assuage their grief over the untimely death of their son by giving Yale a memorial in the form of a grand c
    Page: 23
  • The Saga of Yale Station
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Yale Station has become the focal point of college life. The cultural significance of mail to Yale students is intertwined in the postal history of the nation. In fact, the Collegiate School's first campus in Saybrook was ideally located. When the firs
    Page: 15
  • That Wonderful Window
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Along the south wing of Linsly-Chittenden Hall on High Street is a window that goes unnoticed by most passersby. But for the fans of stained glass work of the great designer Louis Comfort Tiffany, it is a special treasure. Known as the Chittenden Memori
    Page: 15
  • Life after the White House
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: In the spring of 1913, William Howard Taft, Class of 1878, and the first Yale graduate to serve as president of the United States, readily accepted an offer from his alma mater to become Kent Professor of Law. Taft had missed a summons to Yale in 1899 wh
    Page: 18
  • Legacy of a Phony Fraternity
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Pre-dating spring break, spring weekend, or even Derby Day was the no-less-irreverent ritual at Yale called Omega Lambda Chi. The celebration evolved from the impromptu spoofing of fraternity elections in the 1860s into a grand May revel in the early 20
  • Making Book on Memories
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: From their simple beginnings as small volumes about the size of an examination "blue book," Yale College class books evolved by mid-century into monumentally grand, brass-clasped tomes, and by the end of the century became streamlined into the hefty produ
    Page: 96
  • The Era of the "Scramble"
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: In 1893, the mile-and-a-half trek from campus to the athletic fields became quite an event in itself with the installation of a trolley line direct to Yale Field, as the predecessor of the Yale Bowl was known. The cars were open-air, wood-and-brass rigs
    Page: 112
  • The Hideaway in Harkness Tower
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: So powerfully does Harkness Tower dominate the Yale campus that no one passing through the University is likely to miss it. But surprisingly few visitors have seen what lies tucked away at its base. There, just to the left as you pass through the main g
    Page: 72
  • When Glenn Miller Played Yale
    Year: 1993
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: In the midst of World War II, legendary bandmaster Captain Glenn Miller chose Yale as the base for his own tuneful assult on the Axis. Drawn to the University by the heavy concentration of military trainees on the campus, Miller assembled a corps of serv
    Page:
  • George Wilson Pierson, 1904-1993
    Year: 1994
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: As an individual and a scholar Pierson was virtually synonymous with the institution, having attended both the College and the Graduate School, served as chairman of the history department, as well as director of the Division of the Humanities, and occupi
    Page: 88
  • Celebrating the Campus Cops
    Year: 1994
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Civilized as the campus environment was in 1894, it was not hazard-free. Although regulations were passed to keep intruders away, the problems were growing too big for the faculty. At Yale's request, two city policemen were assigned to the task. The st
    Page: 80
  • The Sultan of Swim
    Year: 1994
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Bob Kiphuth didn't arrive at Yale as a legend. He was hired in 1914 as a gymnastics instructor. Four years later, the swimming coach fell ill, a quick replacement was needed, and has given the position. There is no record of Yale's response when Kiphut
    Page:
  • Sacrifice in Stone
    Year: 1994
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: More foot traffic passes through Memorial Hall than any other campus building. The circular "connector" between Woolsey Hall and Commons, its walls bear imposing marble tablets and sculptures in memory of the 1,020 Yale alumni who died in America's wars
  • The Legacy of "Professor Billy"
    Year: 1994
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: William Lyon Phelps, the first president of the Elizabethan Club, that quintessentially Yale retreat for lovers of literature and cucumber sandwhiches, was also one of the most revered faculty members on Yale's lengthy roster of great teachers. Appointed
    Page: 80
  • The Original Temple of Learning
    Year: 1994
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Dwight Hall, used today to accommodate a chapel and offices for many of the University's religious and charitable organizations, served first as the Yale University Library. Designed by Henry Austin in the early 1840s, it remains a provocative reminder o
    Page: 80
  • Secrets of the Spoons
    Year: 1995
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: When the Junior Proms vanished from Yale's winter calendar in the 1980s, so did one of the Colleges more peculiar traditions. For decades, the managers of the galas had been awarded oversized, carved wooden spoons. This custom went back to 1847 and orig
    Page: 96
  • Members Only
    Year: 1995
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Whether in fraternities, junior societies, senior societies, or now, sororities, undergraduates at Yale have shown a remarkably consistent taste for varying degrees of getting together behind closed doors. In the outside world, Yale's senior societies st
  • The First Sociologist
    Year: 1995
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: In 1872, when a Professorship of Political Science was established at Yale, William Graham Sumner was elected to occupy it. Sumner was the son of an immigrant mechanic, had attended public school in Hartford, and graduated from Yale College in 1863. Whe
  • Law School Beginnings
    Year: 1995
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: When the first building for the Yale Law School opened, on April 26, 1895, it was lacking both a name and its front half. The need for the new building had only recently become apparent. Instruction in the law at Yale started in 1801 with the establishm
  • When the Shooting Stopped
    Year: 1995
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Yale's 244th commencement was celebrated with simple exercises on June 22, 1945, and many diplomas were handed out in absentia since their recipients were overseas serving in the war. In his baccalaureate address, President Charles Seymour reflected on t
  • The Way We Ate
    Year: 1995
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Many students complain about the quality and delivery of dining hall foods. The University is making a major effort to address the issue, but if history is any guide, even the best of solutions is likely to be temporary. Institutional food service began
  • Town, Gown, and Tussles
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Although in recent years Yale and New Haven have been growing steadily closer, in times past confrontation was common, and occasionally it got rough. In the wake of the American Revolution, local youths were already testing the mettle of the more privile
    Page: 88
  • Scholar, Collector, Teacher-Tinker
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Following quickly in the footsteps of Professor William Lyon Phelps, Chauncey Brewster Tinker, affectionately known as Tink, became one of the preeminent teachers of English literature at Yale. A member of the Class of 1899, Tinker's Yale career nearly c
    Page: 88
  • A Prominent Central Structure
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: From the Federal era to the Civil War, Yale's campus plan was embodied in the Old Brick Row. In 1893, President Timothy Dwight expressed his wish for "a prominent central structure including a gateway for entrance into the grounds" that would "add greatl
  • A True Struggle of Giants
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Eli oarsmen, by the mid-1880s, were enjoying an almost uninterrupted string of victories against Harvard. In 1896, the Yale crew itched to show the English teams their strength and decided to try their luck in the famous regatta at Henley-on-Thames. The
    Page: 80
  • Original Ivy
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The tradition of ending Class Day with the planting of the class ivy began in 1852, when the planting of the ivy was included in the ceremony for Presentation Day, the forerunner of Class Day. The site for the planting lay at the foot of the southern tow
    Page: 96
  • The Heisman Era
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Carmen Cozza, the winningest football coach in Yale history, announced his retirement in 1996. His announcement incidently coincided with the 60th anniversary of the season in which another towering figure, Larry Kelly '37, became the only man in the his
    Page: 112
  • The Rialto Fire
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Although the mood of Yale students remained subdued following the 10-3 loss to Harvard the weekend before, the entertainment news was hot on Sunday, November 27, 1921. That evening Hollywood's sensational new film, "The Sheik," starring Rudolph Valentino
    Page: 80
  • Peripatetic Divinity
    Year: 1996
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: With its imposing Jeffersonian campus, completed in 1932 on the heights above Science Hill, Yale's Divinity School has an ageless quality about it. The school, however, has been through many moves. The Divinity School was established in 1822, when 15 gr
  • Tables of Trepidation
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: A fortunate few at Yale have offices with a rare piece of equipment: a small but graceful octagonal table. These tables are examples of the original 19th-century student examination table, several hundred of which once filled Alumni Hall, a Gothic Reviva
  • To Freedom's Fallen
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Among the most evocative of Yale's many memorials is the one honoring alumni who perished in World War I. Dedicated in 1927, it completed the Bicentennial Buildings erected in 1901-02. Following a competition, the design of the memorial was awarded to T
  • The Man Behind the College Plan
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Edward S. Harkness, of the Class of 1897, transformed the educational system of the College, enabling it to extend into the 20th century the reputation for quality it had developed in the 19th. Although basically happy, Harkness felt that he could have m
  • His Heart Belonged to Baseball
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The name Amos Alonzo Stagg is almost synonymous with American football. And rightly so: He was one of Yale's greatest players, and he went on to coach the game for 71 years, the longest coaching career in collegiate football history. But Stagg, who grad
  • Dog of Destiny
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The image of the Yale bulldog has inspired generations of Eli athletes and spawned imitators at scores of other schools. But even devoted Yale fans tend to know little about their hound's history. Andrew B. Graves, a member of the Sheffield Scientific S
    Page: 96
  • A Century of Stover
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Stover made his stand in fiction, as the titular hero of "Stover at Yale," a 1912 novel by Owen Johnson '00. While Stover was a fictional character, the Yale he found-and rebelled against-was based heavily on Johnson's own experience as a Yale student.
    Page: 112
  • The College and the "Amistad"
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: From 1839 to 1841, New Haven was the focal point of the "Amistad" Affair, a milestone in the long struggle to end slavery in the United States. During those years a number of Yale alumni, faculty, and students joined with local abolitionists and others t
    Page: 80
  • Clashing over "Conic Sections"
    Year: 1997
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: A dispute over parabolas, hyperbolas, ellipses, and circles led to a student revolt that affected the dynamics of student-faculty relations for generations thereafter. It is remembered in Yale annals as the Conic Sections Rebellion of 1830. The required
    Page: 80
  • Yale on China
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Yale china was first manufactured in the 1930s. The colorful Staffordshire Wedgewood plates and bowls embellished with campus scenes now rank with the most sought-after Yale memorabilia. The plan for a distinctive Yale china was proposed by Edwin Oviatt
    Page: 96
  • In the Days of the "Blue Mittsters"
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: For a 20-year period between the world wars, boxing was a widely popular sport, and Yale was among the nation's most important amateur boxing centers. Eddie Eagan, who enrolled in the Sheffield Scientific School in 1919, won the amateur heavyweight champ
    Page: 80
  • The Good Ship "Yale"
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The walls of Woolsey Hall Rotunda are a powerful testament to the fact that Yale students and graduates have served their country in war since the revolution. But one hundred years ago, during the Spanish-American War, the University's very name was call
    Page: 80
  • The Greatest College Cheer
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: In movies of the white-flannels-and-raccoon-coat era, we frequently encounter enthusiastic collegians shouting "brek-ek-ek-ek" at sporting events. Behind that cinematic cliché is a real cheer invented by Yale students in the 1880s. In April 1903, 12 mem
    Page: 88
  • Tales of the True Fence
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: The tradition of the Yale Fence begin in 1833, when the picket fence fronting the Old Brick Row was replaced by a rail fence on which one could comfortably lean or perch. It soon attracted students in great numbers for the sharing of news and idle chatte
    Page: 96
  • Artist on the Gridiron
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Mention the name Fredrick Remington and most people think of the paintings and sculptures that documented life in the American West. But Remington's first published artwork, which appeared in a Yale newspaper, reflected another of the artist's passionate
    Page: 104
  • A "Jubilee" that Ushered in the Theatre
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: Yale's theatrical tradition had to develop in the face of the College Laws, which forbid acting of any sort. The first undergraduate theatrical productions at Yale originated from performances devised to entertain those students left at school over the T
    Page: 80
  • A Toast to "Legal Inebriation"
    Year: 1998
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Opening: History of drinking by students at Yale and how (and whether) their drinking patterns were altered by Prohibition. Includes description of how students celebrated the end of Prohibition.
    Page: 80
  • An Architect of the moment
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Summary of Eero Saarinen designs of Yale buildings including Ingalls Rink, Morse College, and Ezra Stiles College.
    Page: 96
  • Peabody's " Bone-Digger"
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Brief biography of Othniel Charles Marsh, including education, Western expeditions and meeting with Red Cloud, dinosaur hunting trips, house in New Haven, and estate left to Yale.
    Page: 80
  • Before He Came to Dinner
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Summary of Monty Woolley’s career at Yale as a student (and friend of Cole Porter), assistant professor of drama, and director of undergraduate dramatics. Includes discussion of the falling out between Woolley and George Pierce Baker, Woolley’s departur
    Page: 96
  • When Elis Ruled the Skies
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Summary of the first Intercollegiate Air Contest in 1920, including the three events of which it was comprised, and the pilots who represented Yale: Juan Trippe, G. Willard Horne, and William A. Hanway. Trippe later founded Pan American Airways.
    Page: 88
  • Before the Fall
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Excerpts from letters written by A. Whitney Griswold when he was a student at Yale (class of 1929).
    Page: 104
  • Levi Jackson: Hometown Hero
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Biography of Levi Jackson, first African-American on the Yale football team, and first African-American captain of the Yale football team. Summarizes his athletic career at Yale, and his work at Ford Motor Company after graduation.
    Page: 104
  • Getting Yale on The Right Track
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Summary of how Yale students and city of New Haven celebrated the inauguration of Arthur Twining Hadley on October 18, 1899, and describes train built by students and ridden around campus (Hadley was a railroad management expert). Includes description of
    Page: 88
  • The Birth, Near-Demise, And Come back of "Bright College Years"
    Year: 1999
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of the song, “Bright College Years,” including brief biographical information on Henry Durand, who wrote the words to the song, and explanation of why the song almost fell out of favor during WWI because the tune was German in origin.
    Page: 80
  • The Lipstick
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of the “Lipstick” sculpture by Claes Oldenburg, first placed on Beinecke plaza, later finding a permanent home in Morse College.
    Page: 104
  • The Birthplace of Scientific Farming
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of the house at 52 Hillhouse Avenue, especially as built and occupied by John Pitkin Norton. Includes brief bio on Norton and his career as first agricultural chemist at Yale and proponent of scientific agriculture
    Page: 80
  • Wilbur L. Cross
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Governor
    Abstract: Biography of Wilbur Cross, including information on the various positions he held at Yale: undergrad, graduate student, instructor, professor, first Sterling Professor of English, editor of Yale Review, and dean of the graduate school. Also includes a bri
    Page: 96
  • The Atheneum: Yale's First Chapel
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of the Athenaeum, built in 1763 (when it served as the college’s first chapel) and demolished in 1893.
    Page: 88
  • The Meandering Milestone
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of controversy over the actual founding date of Yale. Includes description of the sesquicentennial celebration in 1850.
    Page: 104
  • Re-running the Y-H-P White House Race
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Summary of elections (2000 and 1912) in which candidates for president and vice-president have been alumni of Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. Includes discussion of other Yale alumni who have run for one of the two top offices.
    Page: 104
  • Learning by Doing
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Summary of scientific education at Yale, with particular focus on Benjamin Silliman. Includes mention of the Franklin Institute, the American Journal of Science, the origins of Sheffield Scientific School, and Silliman’s role in aquiring John Trumbull’s a
    Page: 80
  • Bring On the "Bruisers"
    Year: 2000
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of basketball at Yale, and Yale’s role in changing nine-man basketball to the current five-man sport
    Page: 80
  • Nathan Hale Slept Here
    Year: 2001
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of Connecticut Hall, its construction and various renovations, and names of notable persons who lived there.
    Page: 104
  • Fore!
    Year: 2001
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of golf at Yale, including the golf courses built and used.
    Page: 96
  • Secret Garden
    Year: 2001
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Brief history of landscape gardening at Yale, with focus on Beatrix Farrand, who directed the landscape design and planting of Yale’s grounds from 1922 to 1945.
    Page: 80
  • James Hillhouse: For New Haven for Country, and for Yale
    Year: 2001
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Biographical essay on James Hillhouse, Yale 1773; Yale University treasurer; U.S. representative and senator; commissioner of the Connecticut School Fund; and supervisor of the construction of the Farmington Canal.
    Page: 104
  • Henry Parks Wright Yale's First College Dean
    Year: 2001
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Brief biographical essay on Henry Parks Wright, Yale College’s first dean. Includes mention of Wright Hall (now Lanman-Wright Hall) and its dedication to Wright.
    Page: 88
  • The Tale of Yale's Governor Ingersoll House
    Year: 2001
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: History of the house at 143 Elm (corner of Elm and Temple), originally built by Ralph Isaacs Ingersoll. When his son inhabited the home while governor of Connecticut, it became known as the Governor Ingersoll House.
    Page: 80
  • An Unsung Hero of Medical Research
    Year: 2002
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Summary of the career of Ross Granville Harrison, who discovered a way to grow cells outside of the body. It is considered to be one of the ten greatest discoveries in science
    Page: 96
  • John Hay Whitney
    Year: 2002
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Brief biography of John Hay Whitney, class of 1926. Yale benefactor, Broadway producer, ambassador to England, philanthropist.
    Page: 96
  • Yale and the Origins of Intercollegiate Baseball
    Year: 2002
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A description of Yale’s role in the origins of modern day intercollegiate baseball starting with the development of the game before the Civil War, through the first match against Wesleyan in 1865, and into the 1870s.
    Page: 80
  • Derby Day
    Year: 2002
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of Derby Day, a spring fling of revelry celebrating Yale boat races. Describes the first event in 1923, the formal attire of the early years, weekend events, and transportation.
    Page: 104
  • The Battell Connection
    Year: 2002
    Month/Season: October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of the founding of the Yale School of Music and Battell Chapel thanks to the initiatives of Robbins Battell, Irene Battell, Ellen Battell Stoeckel, Gustave Stoeckel. Also describes their role in starting the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival.
    Page: 104
  • Rudy Vallée, the First Crooner
    Year: 2002
    Month/Season: November
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A brief history of musician and entertainer Hubert Prior “Rudy” Vallée, 1927. Hollywood star in “The Vagabond Lover” and well known radio host, Vallée entered the U.S. Coast Guard in WWII.
    Page: 80
  • When Yale Schooled for War
    Year: 2002
    Month/Season: December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: About the forced early graduation of the class of 1943 due to WWII and the ensuing use of the campus for military training programs.
    Page: 88
  • History on Ice
    Year: 2003
    Month/Season: February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of how Malcolm G. Chase brought hockey to Yale and the U.S. and of Yale’s first victories over Johns Hopkins (1896 February), Harvard, and Columbia.
    Page: 96
  • An Eccentric Economist
    Year: 2003
    Month/Season: March
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Yale professor Irving Fisher contributed to mathematical economics, the national bureau of health, the eugenics movement, and the Rolodex, but is best remembered for his faulty prediction that the 1929 market was at a stable plateau.
    Page: 80
  • A Social Center for the Scientifics
    Year: 2003
    Month/Season: April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of the dedication of Byers Hall by Martha Byers to the Sheffield Scientific School and Yale in 1903.
    Page: 80
  • 'High Flight'
    Year: 2003
    Month/Season: May
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A brief biography of John G. Magee Jr. (admitted class of 1944), who wrote the perennially quoted poem ‘High Flight.’
    Page: 80
  • Pomp? Circumstance? Yes, It All Started At Yale
    Year: 2003
    Month/Season: Summer
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: How, by the invitation of Yale music professor Samuel Sanford, Edward Elgar’s famous “Pomp and Circumstance” came to be played at a U.S. commencement for the first time in Woolsey hall in 1905.
    Page: 104
  • Heart of Glass
    Year: 2003
    Month/Season: September/October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A description of the stained glass windows at Sterling Memorial Library and G. Owen Bonawit, the New York City master craftsman who produced the 3,301 images in just over a year. Bonawit also designed windows for four other buildings at Yale.
    Page: 112
  • Wonah’ilayhunka, Class of 1910
    Year: 2003
    Month/Season: November/December
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A biography of Wonah’ilayhunka, who changed his name to Henry Cloud after converting to Christianity. Cloud’s schooling includes Santee Mission School, Mount Hermon School, and finally Yale, where he became its first Native American college graduate in 1
    Page: 108
  • King and Kingman
    Year: 2004
    Month/Season: January/February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A description of the events surrounding Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.’s honorary doctor of laws from Yale in 1964, including the controversy and opposition concerning the award. Yale President Kingman Brewster honored King for, among many qualities, h
    Page: 112
  • What Yale brought to the fair
    Year: 2004
    Month/Season: March/April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: For the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Yale displayed the world’s first reconstruction of a pterodactyl. It was a replica of a skeleton collected in 1871 by O.C. Marsh and today hangs in the Peabody Museum’s Great Hall of Dinosaurs.
    Page: 72
  • Yale’s first student
    Year: 2004
    Month/Season: May/June
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A biography of Yale’s first student, Jacob Heminway, and a history of Yale’s first few years.
    Page: 68
  • Aloha blue
    Year: 2004
    Month/Season: July/August
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: Yale’s role in beginning the first Hawaiian missionaries, ranging from the education of Henry Obookiah to Hiram Bingham Jr. Also, Ellery Joe Quain Chun, 1831, and his role in the development of the “aloha shirt.”
    Page: 70
  • How the secret societies got that way
    Year: 2004
    Month/Season: September/October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
    Abstract: A history of secret societies and Tap Day at Yale.
    Page: 66
  • Ichabod's progress
    Year: 2005
    Month/Season: January/February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Just say "amen"
    Year: 2005
    Month/Season: March/April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Firing the firebrand
    Year: 2005
    Month/Season: May/June
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Operators were standing by
    Year: 2005
    Month/Season: July/August
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • The "heart of the university" turns 75
    Year: 2005
    Month/Season: September/October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Pioneers
    Year: 2006
    Month/Season: January/February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • The hoot heard 'round the world
    Year: 2006
    Month/Season: March/April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Sacrifice at sea
    Year: 2006
    Month/Season: May/June
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Naphtali Daggett: pastor, Yale president, sniper
    Year: 2006
    Month/Season: July/August
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Yale's first female doctor
    Year: 2006
    Month/Season: September/October
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Yalies in Alaska's History
    Year: 2007
    Month/Season: January/February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • The Man Who Helped Build Yale
    Year: 2007
    Month/Season: March/April
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • The Frisbee files
    Year: 2007
    Month/Season: May/June
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Home for a chaplain
    Year: 2007
    Month/Season: July/August
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann
  • Angell of the CIA
    Year: 2008
    Month/Season: January/February
    Author: Schiff, Judith Ann

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