Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
Yale Library COVID-19 updates.

Jewish Apocalyptic Literature: Home

Introduction

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse by Viktor Vasnetsov.

Featured Titles

Welcome to the research guide for Jewish Apocalyptic Literature!

Daniel's Answer to the King by Briton Rivière.

This research guide serves as an introduction to scholarship on Jewish apocalyptic literature, with particular emphasis on—aside from general resources and research materials—translations, commentaries, and books on specific approaches, passages, and themes.

The literary genre "apocalypse" refers to "an account of a revelation mediated by a heavenly being that discloses a transcendent reality, both spatial and temporal," that is characterized "by the belief that human life is largely shaped by supernatural forces, and bounded by the expectation of the final judgment, including the judgment of the dead."[1] Apocalyptic literature encompasses material from 200 BCE to 200 CE, including the Book of Daniel in the Hebrew Bible and the Book of Revelation in the New Testament, both of which are prophetic, and various apocryphal works, such as 1 & 2 Maccabbes and the Wisdom of Solomon, and pseudepigraphical works, such the Book of Enoch and 2 Baruch.


[1] John J. Collins, Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature.

Yale Divinity Library

Suzanne Estelle-Holmer's picture
Suzanne Estelle-Holmer
Contact:
Yale Divinity School Library
409 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511

L-203
203-432-6374

This research guide was created by Ariadne Tsoulouhas, M.A.R. Second-Temple Judaism, 2021.