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Alumni Resources for the Health Sciences: General Resources

JSTOR - Yale alumni have access to this peer-reviewed database of scholarly journals, literary journals, academic monographs, research reports from trusted institutes, and primary sources.

HeinOnline - Yale alumni have access to this online database for legal history and government documents. It contains the entire Congressional Record, Federal Register, and Code of Federal Regulations, complete coverage of the U.S. Reports back to 1754, and entire databases dedicated to treaties, constitutions, case law, world trials, classic treatises, international trade, foreign relations, U.S. presidents, and much more.

Open Access Dissertations and Theses - search almost four million theses and dissertations, all open access. 

Google Scholar - look for links labeled [PDF] to the right of search results. This connects you to full text from many resources: PubMed Central, ResearchGate, Academica.edu, or institutional repositories.

RefWorks - access is extended to Yale University alumni after graduation. Be sure to update your account prior to graduation.
 

 

Ask the Author

Try asking the author directly for a copy of their work. Find their email address or contact them through ResearchGate or LinkedIn. Then write something like this:

Dear ________,
I have read the abstract of your article __________________. Unfortunately I can't access the whole paper. Could you please send me a PDF or electronic preprint? That would help my work on _______________. Thank you!

  • Make sure you include the full citation -- a prolific author won't necessarily remember papers by topic or even title.
  • Write a clear subject line -- you want the recipient to open the email.
  • Don't ask for a copy if the paper is easily available online.