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Environmental Justice: Home

Welcome

Welcome! This guide provides recommended links and suggested search strategies for the subject of Environmental Justice. This guide is a work in progress, and the links here are by no means exhaustive. If you have recommendations or questions, please reach out to me at rachel.sperling@yale.edu.

Some of the resources on this guide are accessible by the public while others are licensed by Yale University and require valid Yale ID in order to access them.

Related Guides

What is Environmental Justice?

Oxford University Press defines Environmental Justice as

"a social movement and a research subject. Broadly defined, environmental justice means that all people—irrespective of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and physical ability—have the right to live in clean, healthy, and safe environments; to have equal access to safe and healthy workplaces, schools, and recreation areas; and to have access to safe and nutritious food and clean water."
Read more here.

 

Read The Principles of Environmental Justice as affirmed by the Delegates to the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit held on October 24-27, 1991, in Washington DC.

Environmental Justice at Yale

Librarian for Environmental Studies

Rachel Sperling's picture
Rachel Sperling
Contact:
Marx Science and Social Science Library
203-436-5912

Land Acknowledgement

"Yale University acknowledges that indigenous peoples and nations, including Mohegan, Mashantucket Pequot, Eastern Pequot, Schaghticoke,Golden Hill Paugussett, Niantic, and the Quinnipiac and other Algonquian speaking peoples, have stewarded through generations the lands and waterways of what is now the state of Connecticut.  We honor and respect the enduring relationship that exists between these peoples and nations and this land."

For more information on the land acknowledgement, please look here.